Excite Travel
Advertisement
Travel Home2TorialsFlightsCarsCruisesHotels
2TORIAL
Learn2 Read a U.S. Road Map (continued)
Step 3: Navigate the local roads

To the uninitiated, a local road map can look like an unending maze. Don't panic. While different maps will have different road classifications, they all generally work on one basic system: the bolder the road appears on the map, the more prominent it is. After you've found your location and destination on the grid and consulted the key, decide on your route by picking from these main road types:

Primary roads are usually marked with the boldest line (unless a highway passes through the town or city). These are main thoroughfares for the area. They're built for speed and usually have double lanes for each direction of traffic.

Secondary roads are marked with a less bold line. These are also for rapid transit, but are typically two-laned and can move through residential areas as well as business districts.

Minor roads are usually marked with a gray line. These are slower routes, but they can sometimes provide a good shortcut or a more scenic drive.

Unpaved roads and trails are great for scenic trips. They're usually marked by a broken line. Just make sure they aren't private (these should have a special classification), and if you're driving, make sure cars are allowed, and that there aren't any seasonal restrictions, like flooding or snow.

 Previous Step

 Go to Step 4 of 5


 Click here to email this page to a friend  

2TORIAL STEPS
Introduction
Step 1: Use the grid
Step 2: Consult the key
Step 3: Navigate the local roads
Step 4: Hit the highways
Step 5: Understand the symbols and colors

 OTHER 2TORIALS AND LEARNLETS
2torials:
Learnlets:
Autos
Travel
Business
Autos
Travel

 TRAVEL LEARNLETS
File a Baggage Complaint
Adjust to a Slightly Different Time Zone
Order a Meal for a Flight
Get Back to Your Hotel
 More Learnlets...